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The Existential Compost

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30th May 2017

All the Seasides @ 21:33


It is well known, perhaps written in ancient scripture, that a day out to the British seaside is something everyone must commit to at some point in their life. In that regard, I am blessed for I try to make regular trips to the seaside.

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Living in the centre of the UK, where nearly everything is three and a half hours away, means that I am the furthest away from the seaside as you can be at any point in the UK. Moreover, the selection of seaside destinations reachable within a reasonable time from this point is a little bit grim. Hunstanton is one such place, with its miles of coastal caravan parks; Skegness is another, again with miles of coastal caravan parks. And yet for just a half hour extra drive, one can reach beautiful Cromer, which is where Mrs Gnomepants v2.0 and I have just spent our bank holiday weekend.



Regular readers (if there are any left) will know that I have visited Cromer before - a small sleepy Norfolk coastal town famous for its crabs. Cromer's tiny streets are littered with shops selling curios, knick-knacks and tat that most people will only use once, a place which once enjoyed a grander time of bathing machines, day trip ferries embarked via a pier and swanky hotels staffed by gentlemen in smart uniforms. A place as yet unspoilt by amusement arcades, kiss me quick hats and leery youths on drunken stag weekends.
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A trip to the British seaside comes with a checklist of things to do. Over the years I have pared down my list to three things:

  • Fish and chips

  • Ice cream

  • Walk along the prom


While I might also occasionally chuck in "a paddle", "Cream tea in the afternoon" and "A play on the penny cascades", the core holy trinity of food and a walk does me just fine these days, and this weekend I managed all three successfully. The waters around Cromer are Norfolk brown in colour and not the tropical azure that I am used to these days and the thought of dissolving my feet paddling in effluent still does not fill me with joy. Cream teas, while abundant at British seasides, are only really any good when in Devon or Cornwall (sorry FJ, I'm a jam first kind of heathen) and the lack of (or inability to find) arcades in Cromer saw away any chance of chucking away half a tonne of copper coins in the hope of winning a bottle opener in the shape of a naked lady.


None the less, our trip to Cromer was most enjoyable. The seaside ennui began with a late lunch of fish and chips in Mary Janes. Quality, no fuss large cod and chips and a roll and butter for me, with an unbattered haddock and chips for Zoe. I tell you, providing you do your research well, fish and chips at the seaside never fails to please. Unless you're one of those strange people who don't like fish and chips. Mary Jane's is a favourite of mine, with Scarborough's Golden Grid and Whitby's Magpie Cafe also in the top five fish and chip shops in the UK. Naturally, as aladdin_sane would have testified had he still been around, the best fish and chips in the world are from Yorkshire, but alas, when it's a four-hour drive to the Weatherby Whaler, Mary Jane's will have to suffice. Oh, and don't let anyone tell you that Harry Ramsden's is quality fish and chips either. If they do, slap them with a wet piece of huss and tell them to get hence to McDonald's for a Fillet-o-fish.

Next on the checklist was an ice cream. Now I'm a sucker for a whippy ice cream with a flake, but I'm also a sucker for locally produced ice creams as they tend to have unusual flavours. So we took a brisk walk along the pier and the prom (sadly, no brass bands tiddly-om-pom-poming) in hope of finding something worthwhile. Now, as the sun was out in all its glory in Norfolk this weekend, it seemed that every man and his wife, four kids and dog, were also out in force. As a result, the more ideally placed ice cream shops were rammed or had a line of queues outside. Indeed, the pier was quite busy, especially at the embarkation end (where the RNLI lifeboat station is) were middle-aged fathers tried to terrify their children into enjoying themselves by threatening them with freshly crab-laddered crabs. There were even a couple of armed policemen, but such a sight is the norm now that the British Police State is under martial law.


Cromer was also home to the bravest man who ever lived, Henry Bloggs. Bloggs and his chums would fearlessly brave the elements, row a wooden boat far out to sea and rescue drowning townies from watery deaths while smoking a pipe and looking rather cool in a sou'wester. In force 10 gales. For free. With rain lashing his chops. Now you don't see people doing much of that these days do you? No. You don't. Now that's bravery. And, when you're that brave, you get medals, your own monument and a museum named after you. Not bad eh? Oh, and you also have lots of murals drawn around your town in your honour. Makes helping an old biddy with their shopping seem a bit limp.

Sadly parking is a premium in Cromer on popular days, so three hours is not enough to enjoy a sit and a watch of the world going by so we had to leave. Previous visits to this part of the coast, however, had involved a stay or visit to Sheringham and being a stickler for tradition, it was only fair that we popped in to see what the place looks like in season, even if it was only for half an hour.

Sheringham is the upmarket sister of Cromer. Middle classes, mostly with nearby holiday homes, price out the locals and swan about like they own the place. Mostly because they do. The stark difference between Cromer and Sheringham is evident from the upmarket theatre and selection of nearby restaurants in Sherringham. While Cromer's fish and chips attract some diners, it is Sherringham's mix of Nepalese, Thai and European restaurants that mark the contrast there. Indeed, short of organic, artesian gluten-free neo-paleo hypoallergenic ice creams, it is hard not to delight at the pomposity of some of the patrons. Children with names such as Pompidu, Sefton and Chanterey freely express themselves while aloof mums swig large glasses of Prosecco and dads pander to Parmesan and Chigley's ever increasing demands in an attempt to be the best fathers ever.

Indeed, much like Cromer, there are rows and rows of chalets lining the prom. For non-Brits reading, a chalet or beach hut, is basically a really expensive garden shed which you're not allowed to live in. However, it is this quirk that makes this part of the coast so picturesque. The sight of painted wooden huts often with unusual names being cracked open for the first time in six months is a delight to behold and, much like the bathing machine houses in Scarborough and Cromer, is an important part of British seaside heritage.

With bellies full of noms and a distance to travel to our B&B, we left the Norfolk coast once more and headed inland for further bank holiday adventure.
 
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Comments

 
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From:zoefruitcake
Date:30th May 2017 20:46 (UTC)
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Tiddly ompompom
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From:meathiel
Date:31st May 2017 08:45 (UTC)
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I'm definitely one of these strange people as I don't eat fish & chips. Oops!
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From:novemberbug
Date:31st May 2017 09:25 (UTC)
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I know Cromer well - I've been there many times over the years. Mary Jane's is the best fish and chip shop on the East Coast by far - you can tell by the length of their queues.

I prefer Cromer over Sheringham, which seemed quite tired last time I was there in 2014. TBH I prefer Wells-Next-The-Sea to both Cromer and Sheringham, those wide wide beaches are worth the walk from town!
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From:fj_warren
Date:2nd June 2017 11:01 (UTC)
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Don't worry Stegs - I'm a heathen too as I wouldn't dream of putting cream first on a scone! My late aunt would be appalled to hear (or see) me do that but most of my family (mother's side) would put jam then cream. The paternal side went down the cream first route! Have you ever tried 'thunder and lightning' instead of jam and cream? - now that'll put hairs on your chest dear boy but, in all probability, a few inches around your waistline as well!

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